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Android running on iphone

April 22, 2010 Leave a comment

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I found this video of a guy running Android on his iPhone. I had seen other fake videos, but this one is for real. The guy behind the alias Planetbeing has recorded a video with a live demonstration of his achievement in the thrilling terrain of iPhone hacking: a mostly functioning build of Android running on an iPhone 2G.

He considers it still an alpha version; while the touchscreen seems to function well enough and WiFi is in working order, there’s still plenty of work before it’s really practical to use. It’s actually a proof of concept development. There is also no information about the cam working or not.

A thorough list of open to-dos in this port of Android to the iPhone can be found here.

And remember that you should not use this to get porn on your iPhone. That would make Steve Jobs sad.

Your movement is over 93% predictable

February 25, 2010 2 comments

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Little effort for tracking, you are predictable
We think ourselves as being dynamic, unpredictable individuals, but that’s an ilusion. In a study published in last week’s Science, researchers looked at customer location data culled from cellular service providers. By looking at how customers moved around, the authors of the study found that it may be possible to predict human movement patterns and location up to 93 percent of the time.

It’s not currently possible to know exactly where everyone is all the time, but cell phones can provide a pretty good approximation. Cell phone companies store records of customers’ locations based on when the customers’ phones connect to towers, including logins and keepalives for the connection. Taking this data and paring it down to users might allow them to see if they could develop any measure of how predictable human movements and locations are.
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